LEARNING THE ROPES

             On a Mini ring

                     Tutors’ Edition

 

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Description automatically generatedWellington Combined Society

 of Bellringers

 

 

 

 

Health and safety

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

 

 

Health and Safety

Ensure that new learners are briefed on health and safety issues in the tower.

1. Never touch the tower bell ropes unless specifically instructed to do so.

2. Never move around the Ringing Chamber when the tower bells are ringing.

3. Only enter the belfry in the company of an experienced ringer.

4. Look out for floor hazards such as boxes and wires.

5. Be aware of emergency exits. Do not block them. Do not use the lift in a fire or earthquake emergency.

6. Only stand on viewing platform in Belfry.

 

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           Level 1: Foundation Ringing Skills

 

       Handling, Rounds and Call Changes, Striking and Elementary Theory.

 

Can ring bell for both strokes.

 

Can set bell on both strokes.

 

Can ring bell steadily continuously.

 

Hands do not go too high on both strokes.

 

Rope moves vertically on both strokes.

 

Can place bell evenly in rounds.

 

Can maintain rhythm of ringing.

 

Can find position in call changes.

 

Can maintain rhythm when moving places.

 

 

Theory.

Can name parts of a bell.

 

Can write out a course of plain hunt minor, showing place notation at side.

 

Can identify row, change, bell number, place number, back, front, and in and out.

 

 

Level 1 Resources.

 

Bell parts

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Show learner tower bells and identify parts for them. Don’t be too fussy about remembering everything. Terms like stay, slider, and sally, that they will encounter frequently are most important

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If learner is interested, describe tuning.

Bell tuning

·        hum note (an octave below the named note)

·        strike note (also called tap note or named note)

·        tierce (a minor third above named note)

·        quint (a fifth above named note)

·        nominal (an octave above named note)



Ringing pictures:

Illustrates straight rope, balance, and hand stroke and backstroke.


Click to replay gif above

Note the rope goes straight up and down.


Click to replay gif above

Illustrates treble calls to start and even gap between ropes on well-struck bells.



Striking and rhythm


Click here to play a video of ringing on the John David Ring that illustrates good striking, with open handstrokes and closed backstrokes. The ringing is even but a little slow for a mini ring.


Click here to play another video of ringing on the John David Ring that illustrates good striking. The speed is better for a mini ring.




Plain Hunt Minor(6)

Plain Hunt Doubles(5)

 

 

 

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               Level 2: Hunting Around

            Leading, dodging, dot separators for doubles.

Can lead with an open hand stroke.

 

Can lead with a closed backstroke.

 

Can lead off the tenor.

 

Can maintain an appropriate rhythm.

 

Can do internal dodges.

 

Can make internal places.

 

Can maintain rhythm while dodging/making places.

 

Can use a ringing program to practise.

 

 

Theory.

Can write out plain courses of Plain Hunt Doubles and Slapton Slow Course Doubles showing place notation at the side.

 

Can identify the lead-head row, the lead-end row and the lead-end change.

 

Can explain the meaning of a lead.

 

Can explain the meaning of a plain course.

 

Can explain the meaning of extent.

 

Knows the number of changes in extents of minimus, doubles, minor and triples.

 

 

 

Level 2 Resources.

 

Kaleidoscope ringing is a series of exercises made within two places. It can be started at handstroke or backstroke.

The simplest form is “long places”, 4 blows in one place. This is followed by “place making” with two blows being rung in each place and then by “dodging”. Each one demands a higher level of bell control than the previous one. They are best introduced in this order. The aims of the exercises are:

  • To refine bell control
  • To refine listening skills
  • To develop accurate striking and good rhythm
  • To reinforce the concept of “place”

The basic works

  1. The conductor calls the bells to start on a handstroke or a backstroke.
    [Starting at backstroke is good preparation for moving the bell at backstroke when starting to learn Plain Hunt, it can also give practice at backwards leading]
  2. The exercises continue until the conductor calls the bells involved to stop
  3. It is advised to start from rounds to begin with, with only one pair of bells working at a time
  4. When the striking is good, exercises can be undertaken with two or more pairs of bells involved

When these basic manoeuvres have been mastered, they can be combined to form a more advanced exercise. Different exercises can be rung at the same time in different pairs of places, not necessarily starting from rounds.

Long Places

Places

 

Dodging

 

Big change, little change

 

Dodging picture.

Click to replay gif above

Note the bell is rung slower when going up and quicker when going down.

 

Using a ringing program.

Start with Abel attached to the mini ring. Demonstrate how it works.

Find out what technology the learner has and encourage them to get an appropriate program.

Abel for Windows, Mobel for Apple. Also consider Methodology, Tadhill, Beltower and Virtual Belfry.

Keep in mind that our ringers have most experience of Abel and Mobel, so can offer assistance.

 

Slapton Slow Bob Doubles

Explain the dot separator as it applies to doubles. Work through the first lead together.

5.1.5.123.125.123.5.1.5.125

 

 

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Level 3: Hunting in methods to Thirds Place

 

      Plain hunting to methods, ringing inside to doubles.

 

Can identify treble and working bells.

 

Can identify what working bells do when treble leads in Slapton Slow Course Doubles.

 

Can hunt to thirds place in doubles methods.

 

Can ring simple inside bells to doubles methods.

 

Can use a ringing program to practise methods.

 

 

Theory.

Can explain a bob.

 

Can explain a single.

 

Can enter a simple composition into a ringing program

 

 

Level 3 Resources.

 

Using a ringing program.

Show how to enter new methods.

 

Moving around

Normally use resources in the order listed.

Slapton Slow Bob Doubles

Learner rings 2nd. Only has to spot one bell and the treble each lead. Reasonably easy to interpret place notation.

 Order of other three bells can be changed with 123 bob. See Level 2 Resources for place notation and blue line.

Un-named method

Ashford Little Bob Doubles

 

3.1.125.123.345.123.125.1.3.1

5.1.3.1.5.125

 

 

 

Learner could ring 2 and3.

Learner rings treble. Only two bells per lead for treble to find. First one should be easy as it has made seconds.

 

 

Ashford Little Bob Doubles

Bistow Little Bob Doubles

5.1.3.1.5.125

5.125.5.1

 

 

Learner rings treble. Only two bells per lead for treble to find. First one should be easy as it has made seconds.

 

 

 

Cloister Doubles

Wotsit

5.1.3.1.3.1.

5.1.345.1.5.125

Learner rings 1 and 2.

Learner rings 1 and 5.

 

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    Level 4: Hunting in methods to Fifths Place

         Plain hunting to methods, covering with the tenor.

Can ring the treble to plain doubles methods.

 

Has rung a quarter peal.

 

Can cover to doubles methods.

 

 

Theory

Can write out plain courses of Maplin Bob Minor and Single Court Bob Minor, showing the place notation at the side.

 

Can identify what place is made when the treble moves from 2-3 in SCBM.

 

Can identify what the other bells do when fourths place is made in SCBM.

 

 


 

 

Level 4 Resources.

 

Moving around

Normally use resources in the order listed.

 

Doodah

5.1.5.145.5.1.5.125

Learner can ring 1, going up to fourths place, 2 hunting up to long fifths and back then seconds over treble, and 5 doing the opposite of 2.

Un-named method

See Level 3 Resources. Learner rings 1. Has a fairly easy progression up to fifths place.

Candover Place Doubles

5.1.5.123.5.123.5.1.5.1

Learner rings 1?

Tenoring behind.

To start with, use Wotsit, Cloister and Doodah and Bistow

Learner should by now be able to ring treble to 5ths place and back.


 

 

Writing out methods.

Single Court Place Doubles

 

5.145.5.1.5-145

 

 

 

Maplin Bob Minor

Explain internal places and how to work with them. Work through the first lead together.

Show how the treble path is fixed and can be used as a framework.

Focus on the work at the lead end to identify the lead end row, lead head row, etc.

X16X1236X1236X1236X16X12

 

 

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               Level 5: Moving on to Minor

         Plain hunting on 6, Ringing inside to simple methods.

 

Can lead off the last place bell.

 

Can ring the treble to plain minor methods.

 

Can ring Single Court Minor inside.

 

Has rung a quarter of Minor.

 

Can use a ringing program to practise a method inside.

 

 

Theory.

Can explain coursing order.

 

Can explain before and after bell.

 

Can identify 5 calling positions in a minor method.

 

Can write out plain hunt royal and identify the coursing order.

 


 

 

Level 5 resources.

Coursing order.

On the right you will see plain hunt on 6 written out.  Look at the path of the 6th (black line) and you will see the path that it follows amongst the other bells.  The way it moves down to the front and then back up again is called “coursing”.  Now look at the 5th (red line) and you will see that it courses in the same way as the 6th but just after it with 1 bell between the 5th and 6th in each change.  It then leads and lies behind after the 6th.  We say that the 5th is coursing after the 6th.  If you now look at the 3rd you will see that it courses after the 5th in exactly the same way.  All the bells are doing the same thing.

Now look at the column of figures to the left of the plain hunting; these are the bells which are leading at any point.  Remember that each bell leads and lies behind for 2 blows

They are leading in the order 246531.  This is called the “coursing order”.  Coursing orders are normally stated from the tenor so we would usually say that the coursing order is 531246.  Note that this is odd numbers decreasing followed by even numbers increasing.

The bell which is coursing ahead of you, i.e. the 6th if you are ringing the 5th, is called your “course bell” and the bell which is coursing after you (the 3rd if you are ringing the 5th) is called your “after bell”.

Looking at the plain hunt again, you will see that the order in which the bells lead and lie behind is the coursing order.  If you now look at the

order in which the tenor passes the other bells as it courses down to the front and again as it courses up to the back, it passes them in the coursing order.

The coursing order will stay the same unless the bells are swapped over, for example by a bob or single.

 

 

2

4

6

5

3

1

Plain Hun

 

Another explanation.

In Plain Hunt and Plain Bob the coursing order is the order in which you follow the bells.

The concept of coursing order can be applied to other methods too.

 

Coursing Order

 

The easiest way to see the coursing order is by looking at the order that specific bells (e.g. the treble, the 2nd and the 6th) pass the other bells in Plain Hunt.  You will notice a circular pattern. This is the coursing order and on 6 bells it is 653124 i.e. the 5th courses the 6th, the 3rd courses the 5th and the treble courses the the 3rd.

In Plain Hunt and Plain Bob, the coursing order is the order in which many things happen:

You ring over the other bells in the coursing order.
The bells come to the front in the coursing order.
The bells go to the back in the coursing order.

Your  course bell  is the bell you follow down to the lead – so you might hear someone say “take your course bell off the lead.” Your  after bell  is the bell that follows you down to lead – hence the instruction “your after bell takes you off the back”.

 

 

Instructional youtube video about coursing order.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StPKRAKKuzc

 

 

Moving around

Normally use resources in the order listed.

 

Bastow Little Bob Minor

Maplin Bob Minor

X12X16

See Level 4 Resources.

Learner rings 2.

Learner ring treble.

 

 

Reading Old Bob Doubles

St Simon's Bob Doubles

5.1.5.3.5.3.5.1.5.1)

5.1.5.3.5.3.5.1.5.125

Learner rings treble.

Learner rings treble.

 

College Bob Minor

(X16X36X36-16)

Learner rings treble.

 

Plain Bob Minor

X16X16X16X16X16X16X12

Learner rings treble.

 

Un-named Minor Method

X16X1236X1236X1236X16X16

Learner rings treble.

 

Calling positions – 2nds place lead end methods.

Little Bob Minor

B = Before/Out  Called when about to make seconds.

W = Wrong  Called when about to dodge 56 up.

I = In  Called when about to dodge 34 down.

F = Fourths  Called when about to dodge 34 up.

H = Home.  Called when about to dodge 56 down.

 

 

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